Category Archives: Water

Warrant Articles #39 & 40: Amend General Bylaws: Stormwater Management Revisions, Amend Zoning Bylaw: Stormwater

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More details on 2019 Warrant Articles #39 & 40: Stormwater

Stormwater is water that runs off the land, typically following rainfall, snow melt, or a leak or overflow. On landscapes impacted by human development, stormwater can carry sediment, fertilizer, harmful bacteria, oil, gas, toxic metals, and salt into nearby waterways. Water that runs into storm drains is water that is not available to nurture plants or recharge aquifers. The 2019 Acton Town Meeting Warrant has two warrant articles concerning stormwater and stormwater management. Green Acton recommends voting in favor of both of them.

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2019 Election for Acton Water District Commissioner

The Acton Water District (AWD) is an independent government entity, separate from Acton Town government. As such, it is led by a Board of Water Commissioners, analogous to the Board of Selectmen for the Town of Acton; both serve as the legislative bodies for their respective entities. The three Water Commissioners are elected officials, who serve three-year terms of office. In the 2019 election, one candidate will be on the ballot for one available Water Commissioner seat: Barry Rosen.

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Green Acton Position on Extending Nagog Pond Order of Conditions

At the Green Acton meeting on December 11, 2018, by consensus of the Directors present, Green Acton adopted the following position with respect to Concord’s application for a three-year extension to its Order of Conditions (“wetlands permit”) for the expansion of its water treatment facility at Nagog Pond:

In view of the important new information that has come to light in the three years since the Acton Conservation Commission last considered Concord’s expanded water treatment facility on Nagog Pond, Green Acton urges ConsCom to deny the requested three-year extension, invite a new Notice of Intent, and then hold a hearing that could deliberate on a wider range of potential environmental harms and remedies than were addressed in the original Order of Conditions.

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Missed the 1,4-Dioxane Panel? View it here.

On Oct. 25, 2018, Acton residents benefited from a crash course on 1,4-Dioxane in Acton’s groundwater and drinking water.

From left to right: Moderator Kim Kastens and panelists Matt Mostoller, Dan Groher, and Diane Manganaro. Photo by Norm Strahle.

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Has Acton’s 1,4-Dioxane situation been getting better or worse?

The previous post looked at the 1.5-year-old effort to divert 1,4-Dioxane in the Nuclear Metals, Inc. (NMI) plume before it can reach the public water supply. This post looks at a longer time frame, and asks whether dioxane levels in the Acton public water supply wells have been getting better or worse over the scale of a decade.

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The intervention to divert Nuclear Metal’s 1,4-Dioxane from reaching the public water supply

As discussed in earlier Green Acton posts, there is a plume of 1,4-Dioxane flowing from the Nuclear Metals, Inc. (NMI) Superfund Site, passing under the Assabet River, and impacting the water quality at the Assabet 1 public water supply well. Fortunately, there is a pro-active remediation effort underway to intercept and treat this contaminated water.

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How can the NMI dioxane plume go underneath the Assabet River?

One of the more surprising aspects of Acton’s 1,4-dioxane situation is that the contaminant plume coming down from the NMI Superfund site goes underneath the Assabet River and thus reaches the Acton Water District’s Assabet 1 public water supply well.

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The 1,4-Dioxane Plume from the NMI Superfund Site

Nuclear Metals, Inc. was a company that made depleted uranium munitions for the Department of Defense at a 46-acre site on Rt. 62 in Concord, just across the Concord–Acton town line. These activities resulted in significant contamination of the soil, sediment, and groundwater, and the site is now part of the federal Superfund program. Of concern to Acton, there is a plume of 1,4-Dioxane traveling through the groundwater, passing underneath the Assabet River, and reaching the Assabet 1 public water supply well in the southeast corner of Acton.

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1,4-Dioxane

1,4-Dioxane is an organic compound that was widely used as a solvent and stabilizer in industrial applications during the late 20th century. Continue reading