Category Archives: Water

Green Acton Position on Extending Nagog Pond Order of Conditions

At the Green Acton meeting on December 11, 2018, by consensus of the Directors present, Green Acton adopted the following position with respect to Concord’s application for a three-year extension to its Order of Conditions (“wetlands permit”) for the expansion of its water treatment facility at Nagog Pond:

In view of the important new information that has come to light in the three years since the Acton Conservation Commission last considered Concord’s expanded water treatment facility on Nagog Pond, Green Acton urges ConsCom to deny the requested three-year extension, invite a new Notice of Intent, and then hold a hearing that could deliberate on a wider range of potential environmental harms and remedies than were addressed in the original Order of Conditions.

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Missed the 1,4-Dioxane Panel? View it here.

On Oct. 25, 2018, Acton residents benefited from a crash course on 1,4-Dioxane in Acton’s groundwater and drinking water.

From left to right: Moderator Kim Kastens and panelists Matt Mostoller, Dan Groher, and Diane Manganaro. Photo by Norm Strahle.

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Has Acton’s 1,4-Dioxane situation been getting better or worse?

The previous post looked at the 1.5-year-old effort to divert 1,4-Dioxane in the Nuclear Metals, Inc. (NMI) plume before it can reach the public water supply. This post looks at a longer time frame, and asks whether dioxane levels in the Acton public water supply wells have been getting better or worse over the scale of a decade.

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The intervention to divert Nuclear Metal’s 1,4-Dioxane from reaching the public water supply

As discussed in earlier Green Acton posts, there is a plume of 1,4-Dioxane flowing from the Nuclear Metals, Inc. (NMI) Superfund Site, passing under the Assabet River, and impacting the water quality at the Assabet 1 public water supply well. Fortunately, there is a pro-active remediation effort underway to intercept and treat this contaminated water.

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How can the NMI dioxane plume go underneath the Assabet River?

One of the more surprising aspects of Acton’s 1,4-dioxane situation is that the contaminant plume coming down from the NMI Superfund site goes underneath the Assabet River and thus reaches the Acton Water District’s Assabet 1 public water supply well.

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The 1,4-Dioxane Plume from the NMI Superfund Site

Nuclear Metals, Inc. was a company that made depleted uranium munitions for the Department of Defense at a 46-acre site on Rt. 62 in Concord, just across the Concord–Acton town line. These activities resulted in significant contamination of the soil, sediment, and groundwater, and the site is now part of the federal Superfund program. Of concern to Acton, there is a plume of 1,4-Dioxane traveling through the groundwater, passing underneath the Assabet River, and reaching the Assabet 1 public water supply well in the southeast corner of Acton.

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1,4-Dioxane

1,4-Dioxane is an organic compound that was widely used as a solvent and stabilizer in industrial applications during the late 20th century. Continue reading

Green Acton/LWV Event: Panel Discussion of 1,4-Dioxane in Acton’s Water

The Green Acton Water Committee and the Acton-area League of Women Voters are sponsoring an educational panel discussion about 1,4-Dioxane in Acton’s water supply.

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Water Quality

Acton’s waters contain many materials in them other than pure H2O. Some of these are natural and others are introduced through human processes. This page indexes information about the quality of the groundwater, surface waters, and drinking water of Acton.

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Green Acton Water Committee

Mission:

Green Acton’s Water Committee works to protect and improve Acton’s ground, surface and drinking water, through information gathering, advocacy, public education, and collaboration with other concerned groups.  More specifically, the Water Committee:

  • Continues the work of ACES in watchdogging the Superfund sites that threaten Acton’s water quality
  • Monitors threats and risks to the quality of Acton’s ground, surface, and drinking water, from any and all sources
  • Monitors threats and risks to water quantity and water availability, including from overdevelopment, climate change, population growth, and neighboring towns
  • Gathers, organizes and disseminates information and data relevant to water in Acton
  • Works to overcome threats to the quality or quantity of Acton’s water  through citizen advocacy, information sharing, public education, and other means.

Get involved:

The Water committee meets face-to-face once a month, generally on the second Sunday of the month, 2:30-4:30  in the Acton Memorial library (double check GA calendar, however).  We also have an active email discussion group.  The committee welcomes new participants at our meetings or on our discussion list. For questions or to join the email group:  water-core@greenacton.org.  Continue reading