Category Archives: Water Infrastructure and Regulation

Green Acton Position on Extending Nagog Pond Order of Conditions

At the Green Acton meeting on December 11, 2018, by consensus of the Directors present, Green Acton adopted the following position with respect to Concord’s application for a three-year extension to its Order of Conditions (“wetlands permit”) for the expansion of its water treatment facility at Nagog Pond:

In view of the important new information that has come to light in the three years since the Acton Conservation Commission last considered Concord’s expanded water treatment facility on Nagog Pond, Green Acton urges ConsCom to deny the requested three-year extension, invite a new Notice of Intent, and then hold a hearing that could deliberate on a wider range of potential environmental harms and remedies than were addressed in the original Order of Conditions.

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Missed the 1,4-Dioxane Panel? View it here.

On Oct. 25, 2018, Acton residents benefited from a crash course on 1,4-Dioxane in Acton’s groundwater and drinking water.

From left to right: Moderator Kim Kastens and panelists Matt Mostoller, Dan Groher, and Diane Manganaro. Photo by Norm Strahle.

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The intervention to divert Nuclear Metal’s 1,4-Dioxane from reaching the public water supply

As discussed in earlier Green Acton posts, there is a plume of 1,4-Dioxane flowing from the Nuclear Metals, Inc. (NMI) Superfund Site, passing under the Assabet River, and impacting the water quality at the Assabet 1 public water supply well. Fortunately, there is a pro-active remediation effort underway to intercept and treat this contaminated water.

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1,4-Dioxane

1,4-Dioxane is an organic compound that was widely used as a solvent and stabilizer in industrial applications during the late 20th century. Continue reading

Water Quality

Acton’s waters contain many materials in them other than pure H2O. Some of these are natural and others are introduced through human processes. This page indexes information about the quality of the groundwater, surface waters, and drinking water of Acton.

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Unanimous vote in favor of Conant land purchase

There was standing room only at the Acton Water District special district meeting for the vote on whether to authorize the district to purchase 11.23 acres of land in the groundwater protection zones for the Conant 1 and 2 wells. Green Acton President Debra Simes read Green Acton’s position statement. The vote was unanimous in support of the purchase. 

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What happened at the Acton Water Workshop?

On September 22, 2018, Acton held its first “Water Workshop.” Representatives from the Board of Selectmen, the Acton Water District, Town staff, and selected Town committees worked together in small groups to consider five scenarios about possible future developments related to water in Acton.

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Mark Your Calendar for Two Important Water Events

Two interesting events about water in Acton are coming up this fall. Continue reading

Acton Water District offers Discount for Low-to-Moderate-Income Seniors

The Acton Water District (AWD) has recently clarified and streamlined its discount program for low-to-moderate-income seniors.

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What would a good outcome to the Nagog Pond controversy look like?

There has been a lot of negativity around Concord’s proposal to expand its water treatment plant at Nagog Pond and Acton’s reaction to the same. In this post, let’s take a step back and try to envision what a good outcome might look like. A good outcome would safeguard the ecosystems of Nagog Pond and Nagog Brook, and would be a win-win-win for the three towns that share legal rights to the waters of Nagog Pond.

A good — and possible — outcome would:

  1. scale the water treatment capacity to the size of the pond
  2. develop a protocol for timing water withdrawals and releases so as to minimize harm to the downstream ecosystem and aquifer
  3. collaborate on data collection and hydrologic modeling to provide decision-makers with answers to “what if” questions
  4. construct and administer the water treatment plant as a regional facility with costs and water shared among the three towns

Kim Kastens floated some of these ideas in her talks at the First Parish of Concord on February 25 and at the Acton Senior Center on April 5. (Thanks to the attendees for their enthusiastic reception and insightful suggestions.) This post is not offered as a complete and final answer to the question posed in the title, but rather, as an invitation to consider a wider range of possibilities.

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